Help Ban Fracking in Western Australia

Screen Shot 2018-03-19 at 1.03.05 pmScreen Shot 2018-03-19 at 12.56.23 pmScreen Shot 2018-03-19 at 12.58.39 pmScreen Shot 2018-03-19 at 12.59.40 pmScreen Shot 2018-03-19 at 1.01.08 pmIt’s been such a beautiful week.  We are so lucky to live in an area incredibly rich in outdoor activities.  We spent time at the beach, swimming at the pool, enjoying a picnic with a friend and ran amok in the yard as the sun began to set each night.

That being said – beyond our personal activities; today is an important day for the region.  The Inquiry into Fracking has now closed it’s scientific submission period.

I’ve written a personal submission and also helped local group P.O.W.E.R Eneabba with their group submission as well.  Many other concerned citizens across the region have also picked up pens, and participated in Lock the Gate workshops to prepare and submit for themselves.  It’s encouraging to see people have hope and passion to keep on protecting this special place.  A statement in the press claimed there were approximately 8,500 individual submissions received by the panel.

The loosely regulated gas industry has been causing disruption in the community since 2012 and are well poised to roll out the invasive gas wells across the region in as near as 2020.

Things are now coming to a head.

We now wait with baited breath to see what the results will be.

Here’s hoping that there are advocates for farmers, the environment and water rights amongst the policy makers sitting in office.

One way you can still help influence positive change, is to sign this petition/.

It calls on the government to impose a full ban on fracking to protect all citizens in the State of West Australia from the risks of water contamination, disruption to the local commerce, agriculture and ecology.

Can you help?

Farmers, Greens & Unions – United to Stop Anti-Protest Laws

Tuesday afternoon I found myself standing at parliaments front steps.  It was here that I began photographing the handover of a petition of over 14,600 signatures. Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 9.03.23 PM

Farmer, Rod Copeland believes anti protest laws could hinder his ability to protect his farm from fracking.

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Mark McGowan MLA, WA Labor Leader – Publicly rejected this new bill in a speech, as did farmers Catherine Davenport and Rod Copeland.Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 9.03.01 PM Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 9.01.28 PM Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 6.59.50 PMScreen Shot 2015-04-21 at 9.04.22 PM

Piers Verstegen from Conservation Council of Western Australia, also spoke against the bill.

A diverse group of organisations and individuals from across Western Australia (including: farmers, conservation groups, religious organisation and unions) were protesting the state governments vague new law that would see a protester jailed for up to two years and fined upward of $20,000 dollars.

You can view the new bill in all it’s vague glory here.

The bill is not specific and could lead to even the most passive of protester being arrested.

68AB. Preparation for physical prevention or trespass 2 (1) A person must not make, adapt or knowingly possess a 3 thing for the purpose of using it, or enabling it to be 4 used, in the commission of — 5 (a) an offence under section 68AA; or 6 (b) an offence under section 70A. 7 Penalty: imprisonment for 12 months and a fine 8 of $12 000″

You could be jailed up to two years just for holding a “thing” which could mean holding a shovel at your gate, or having a chain in your Ute or even waiving a flag.  Not only that, but you’d be presumed guilty and would have to prove your innocence in court.

Great.

If you live in Western Australia and this concerns you too, please write or email your your local MP and let them know it needs to change.

Locals protect Western Australia from Fracking Industry

The town of Eneabba consists of one convenience store, one auto body shop, an elementary school, one tavern and one petrol station.

It is a dry, sandy, vast, empty, desolate landscape.

Total population? 286.

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I will admit freely, that on first glance there was not much to be enthusiastic about Eneabba.

When my partner and I moved to the area we had to convince ourselves that we’d made the right decision. Mike and I discussed this as I watched the rolling horizon sprawl for miles from the passenger seat in our pathetically small car.  I had been warned, but had no idea how people survived let alone farmed in the brutal conditions on this land.  We were only meant to stay for three months. I just needed my second working holiday visa (which in Australia means you need to work in a remote area to extend your visa for a second year).  I was going to check in, do my hard time and then leave. I couldn’t wait to make my exit, and we’d only just arrived.

Through blood, flies, sweat, love, fire, and tears; we lived, worked and relaxed alongside the locals in this isolated town for two years.

Over time, I became enchanted with the place.

The community in Eneabba welcomed us with open arms.  The landscape slowly revealed it’s many natural wonders.

When I wasn’t chasing sheep, or rounding up cattle I was crouched in the bush with my boss observing the exuberant displays of colour exploding through the spiked, brutal bushes from May to December.  She was passionate and quickly showed me the endless variety of wildflowers on her property.

And honestly? It was astounding. The drab lifeless bush that I had initially scanned and discarded was in fact teeming with thousands of varieties of wildflowers.

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Among biologists, this region is regarded as one of the main biodiversity hotspots in Australia (and also world wide). There are over 12,000-recorded species of wildflowers in Western Australia. In fact this region is so highly regarded in it’s diversity that the likes of Sir David Attenborough have been here to study it’s wonders. As a relative comparison the British Isles have 3842 types of plants on record.

While the native flora and fauna have adapted to the harsh, dry conditions; mankind and our counterparts have not. The region’s water is supplied by tapping into subterranean aquifers. This (apart from rain water – which can be sparse) is the only source of water in the region. The locals rely heavily on the bore water to survive and sustain their livelihood (farming cattle and sheep as well as cropping).

This place is special. It’s also worth saving.

The land in this region is currently being pursued relentlessly by the gas industry.

The locals have previously protected the land from coal mining, and have come together again to help protect the countryside from gas mining.  Coorow Shire (where Mike and I spent a season seeding just before we moved to Perth) has just recently called for a moratorium, and it’s very hopeful to know that many other local shires will indeed follow suit.

Right now people are fighting to protect this shared water source from pollution, and prevent future generations disparity over poor choices in our lifetime.

Eneabba is one of those towns.  In fact there are many small communities that are fighting against this terrible industry worldwide.

Australia, United State, Canada and many other countries are all entangled in this mess… If we all speak up and act, it will discourage this damaging, unregulated, dangerous industry from taking hold in small communities and steer us to embrace energy sources that are indeed sustainable.

Please share this blog if you are concerned for future generations right to safe water.

You can also retweet if you follow @Redterrain on Twitter.

© 2014 Redterrain

Eneabba, lets run away together.

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 I’ll sort out my own breakfast though mr. spider…  thanks for offering!

Eneabba always offers up some excellent moments for photography.  Be it birds, wildflowers, the livestock or insects (hey even the people!) there is always something to admire and capture.

This weekend Mike and I spent a few days with Brian and Tessa while they sheared.  Mike definitely did more work than I, as I traipsed around the bush with Tessie (I felt so guilty!).  However, I did manage to make myself useful and cook some dinner and lunch… I hope that made up for my wandering.

It was a really nice getaway.

We brought a very nervous doggie back to the city with us for the week (whom was immediately chucked into the shower with me for a wash…).  With a belly full of dinner, she is now passed out on the bedroom floor.

I’ve heard some news that Coorow shire (where we seeded last year) has called for a moratorium on fracking (HURRAAAAY!) for their area, and I’ll be writing a bit more about that shortly.  We’re hoping that the Carnamah shire follows suit soon.

 

Let’s Stop This Fraccing, Shall We?

Please help us protect Mount Lesueur from a fraccing proposal.  There is not much time left to sign up and petition.

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If you love the photos of the kangaroo’s, wildflowers, birds, insects, sheep, cattle, and beautiful landscapes that I showcase on this blog….then please support the locals and sign this petition.  For many of these delicate, and beautiful things will be in danger.

Fraccing has gained a very negative reputation world wide as a reckless and uncompromising practice.  We’d like to keep it out of Western Australia, where water is absolutely sparse.

Perth people, this is important as the aquifers that supply the city would also be directly affected.  Please share this blog!

The locals would really love your support.

If you want to help, you can find the link here.  I quickly signed up and left my thoughts (you can post your comments anonymously or list your name).  You’ll really will have to sign up quick as this is the last day to leave your comments!

Sincerely,

Holly & Mike